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next-day beef salad {ffwd}

Next Day Beef Salad

I have a favorite recipe for a salad made from grilled steak, with a Cuban flair. It’s long been my go-to summer recipe when there’s leftover steak in the fridge. It looks like this week’s recipe for French Fridays with Dorie, Next-Day Beef Salad, introduces some competition all year long!

Next-Day Beef is a perfect way to create a second meal from leftover beef that doesn’t seem at all like leftovers. The meat is diced into small pieces and combined with a variety of fresh and piquant ingredients. Dorie invites us to play with what’s in our refrigerators, making this a doubly practical meal.

Staples for me

Staples for me

I stayed fairly close the written recipe, adding scallions, cornichons, capers, slivered olives, and grape tomatoes. For the peppers, I used a combination of candied jalapeños and peppadew peppers for a mixed dose of sweet and spicy. (As you might expect, I skipped the apple. You’re welcome, Howard.) All of this gets tossed in a mustardy mayonnaise and served on a bed of mixed greens.

Confetti

For once, I planned ahead, serving steak and baked potatoes one night, making sure there was enough leftover to test out the Next-Day Beef Salad for the next night. This made a light dinner served alongside a loaf of rosemary bread and a wedge of brie with mushrooms. Leftovers of the leftovers made a perfect lunch as well.

Bread And Cheese

I loved all of the ingredients, which are staples in my refrigerator. In some ways, it reminds me of the Cuban salad that I like, but with a completely different flavor profile. The only thing I’d change next time is to cut way back on the dressing. The end result was a bit too creamy for both our tastes. Just one tablespoon or two would have been plenty to bind it all together. I also think a simple vinaigrette would be another variation to try.

Leftover Meat

I’m thrilled to have a new option on the list of repurposing leftover beef. I’m sure I will be making this again.

To see what the other Doristas thought of their beef salads, check out their links here. We don’t post the recipes, but you can find it on page 260 of Dorie Greenspan’s book Around My French Table.

Dinner Under Pressure

Pressure Cooked Risotto

Two passionate cooks live at my house. Both my husband Howard and I love to experiment in the kitchen. We have completely different approaches though. I am the Luddite. Aside from combining ingredients in the food processor, blender, or stand mixer, it’s a mostly manual process.

On the other hand, for Howard, it’s all about the technology. He’s been into sous-vide cooking for years, first assembling his own water immersion unit, then recently buying a more professionally built one. He has a hefty vacuum sealer and the Modernist Cuisine library.

The most recent addition to his arsenal is a pressure-cooker. Pressure cookers aren’t actually new-fangled, or even electric, in this case, so I suppose it’s debatable whether it’s a truly high-tech device. All I can say is that the idea of pressure cooking has always terrified me. I always imagine a resulting explosion and food all over the kitchen ceiling. I’ve been assured by kitchen shop salespeople and more fearless cooks than I that current pressure cooker designs make disaster unlikely, but I’ve had my doubts.

Howard did extensive research, and we visited multiple kitchenware stores. The winner was a Fagor Duo (also a top pick by Cooks’ Illustrated).

Fagor Duo Pressure Cooker

So, what to make as the debut pressure cooked recipe? Howard’s research indicated risotto would be an excellent choice. We have always enjoyed risotto, at home more than in restaurants. I make it somewhat regularly, though not often. There are infinite variations. It’s the perfect vehicle for leftovers. But all that stirring? It’s time-consuming.

Howard told me that once all the chopping was done, risotto in the pressure cooker would take only 7 minutes, unattended. Humph. That seems work a try, as long as he was in charge of the pressure.

We started with a basic risotto with onion, garlic, carrots and fennel. To turn it into a meal, we added assorted leftovers at the end: shredded turkey confit, mashed rutabaga, and braised kale.

It worked. Once the pressure was reached, Howard turned the heat down just a little to stabilize things. Seven minutes later, the rice was perfectly moist and cooked through. Amazing!

I like knowing that when we’re short on time, we can make such an elegant and easy dinner from pantry items and added inspiration from the leftover stash in the refrigerator. Who would think?

Pressure-Cooked Risotto
Serves 6-8

¼ cup olive oil
1 onion, diced
½ bulb fennel, cored and diced
1 medium carrot, peeled and diced
3 cloves garlic, minced
1½ cup Arborio rice
2½ cups chicken stock
2/3 cup dry sherry
Chopped fresh rosemary and thyme leaves
Salt and pepper to taste

2-4 cups of additional ingredients, i.e. shredded cooked meat, cooked vegetables, vegetable puree

In the pressure cooker base, heat the oil over medium heat. Add onion, fennel, carrot, and garlic. Cook until tender and translucent, about 3 minutes. Stir in the rice so that it coats with oil and starts to turn translucent, about 2 minutes. Add chicken stock and sherry and stir. Pressure-cook on high for 7 minutes. Start timing when full pressure is reached. Depressurize the cooker. Taste for doneness. If it isn’t quite done, simmer for a few more minutes, uncovered, no pressure. Stir in fresh herbs and season to taste. Fold in any additional ingredients and serve.