Category Archives: Soup

Pound Cake and Panade #MyParisKitchen {CtBF}

The end of the year is coming fast, and November has been crazy!  I had a quick visit to Philadelphia to meet up with my sisters for a happy family event.  We packed in the activities, as we always do.  Our mother was not one to sit still, and she trained us to be the same way.

Me with My Sisters

I really like cake, plain simple unfrosted cakes.  I could take or leave birthday cakes or other layered cakes, but I always enjoy a pound cake, a Bundt cake, or any kind of one layer cake.  A simple glaze or a dusting of powdered sugar makes them complete, no fussing required.  For Howard, I think it’s all about the frosting as he never gets excited when I make a cake, so they are usually relegated to occasions where I’m having just my friends over or bake something to bring somewhere else.

My favorite bakery cake is the Vanilla Bean Pound Cake made by Hi-Rise Bakery in Cambridge.  They are regulars at the Lexington Farmers’ Market and, in season, I treat myself to a slice about once a month.  The genius of their cake is that it’s soaked in vanilla-infused simple syrup, making the outside crust magical.  Eating an end piece with its extra crust is just heaven. I’ve never made it myself, but here’s the recipe.

Right before I left, I made David Lebovitz’s Bay Leaf Pound Cake, the first November challenge recipe for Cook the Book Fridays.  I did NOT need a whole cake.  I had nowhere to bring it that week.  So, I minified it.  I made one-third of the recipe (dividing by the eggs, of course) to fill one small loaf pan – a personal pound cake.

This cake is a little different than a traditional pound cake recipe because rather than creaming the butter, the butter is melted.  In this case, the butter is then infused with bay leaves to add some depth of flavor.  A couple of bay leaves are also set on the bottom of the pan to add more bay flavoring.

“Line of Creamed Butter”

We are also instructed to squeeze a line of soft butter on top of the cake to enhance a decorative crack.  It could be because of my smaller pan, but that didn’t happen on my cake.

Uncracked Cake

The final touch was an orange glaze.  The cake’s predominant flavor was orange.  Even with the infused butter and extra leaves, I didn’t notice the bay flavoring at all.  Overall, this was a lovely cake, small enough for me to eat a daily slice for a few days.  It wasn’t interesting enough to make again, though I did enjoy it while it lasted.

The second recipe for Cook the Book Fridays is Panade de Butternut (Butternut Squash Bread Soup).  To read the C&C (comments and concerns) post for this recipe, it wasn’t getting a lot of love, so I was a bit wary.

The recipe took a bit of advanced planning.  David recommends homemade stock for this one.  We were finishing up a whole chicken, so that was easy enough with a carcass on hand.  I’ve been making stock in the slow cooker for the past few years which is so simple.  Sourdough bread was also required.  My sourdough starter needed a workout this week, so I managed to bake my own loaf to use.  Stock?  Check!  Bread? Check!  I was ready to go.

Homemade Sourdough

This panade is a layering of caramelized onions, toasted sourdough bread, sliced butternut squash, chopped thyme and sage, and grated cheese doused with the homemade chicken stock.  I halved the recipe for our household.  I must have sliced the bread too thickly because there wasn’t nearly enough to fully cover the pan for even two layers, and the recipe called for three.  That means I had three layers of squash and just two of bread, which was fine.

Soup? Bread Pudding? Casserole? Whatever… Delicious!

As the panade baked, the bread absorbed all the stock, so the result was more like bread pudding than soup.  It also reminded me of a lighter version of the filling for a stuffed pumpkin I’ve made. Whatever it was, it was delicious!  All the flavors of fall combined into one hearty dish.  It would be a wonderful alternative to stuffing for the Thanksgiving table.  On the downside, if I’m being honest, even though I really liked it, in my opinion, it was a lot more work than it was worth.

Judge for yourself!  Recipes for both the pound cake (page 296) and the panade (page 163) can be found in David Lebovitz’s My Paris Kitchen.  My friends from Cook the Book Fridays made these too.  You can find their reviews for the cake here and the panade here.

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Love for Ugly Vegetables {CtBF}

Celery root aka celeriac, that gnarly gritty bulbous vegetable.  Celery root is rather intimidating to look at, but inside is an ivory root vegetable that’s a savory treat.  As the name implies, celery root and celery are related.  They are two different forms of celery.  In the case of celery root, its variety has been developed for the edible root.  The stalks and leaves are edible too, chock full of celery flavor, though typically the stalks are spindly, not substantial, the way a head of celery grows.

From March through November, I work as a volunteer at Lexington Community Farm on Thursday mornings.  My tasks are varied, focused in the greenhouse during the winter months, moving to the fields as the season unfolds.  Last week, I helped bag up vegetables for the farm’s post-season bulk fall vegetable sale.  I was productive, bagging up 460 pounds of carrots (in 10 pound bags), 45 pounds of garlic (in 1 pound bags), and 55 pounds of celery root (in 5 pound bags) and a few more things that I can’t remember.

When I left, one of the farmers offered me a bucket of celery root that had been harvested the previous week so wasn’t up to snuff for selling in the stand.  I’m not sure whether I knew this week’s recipe selection for Cook the Book Fridays at the time, but I happily accepted.

Celery root soup with horseradish cream and ham chips provides a perfect way to make a dent in my supply of celery root.  The soup itself couldn’t be easier.  Diced (and peeled!) celery root is added to sautéed leeks along with water, thyme sprigs, a bay leaf and salt and simmered until the celery root is tender.  After removing the bay leaf and thyme stems, the mixture is pureed in the blender.  Voilà!

The result is a smooth ivory bowl of soup, which on its own is somewhat bland.  However, it serves as a willing palette for garnishes.  And the garnishes supplied in this recipe are outstanding.

First, we have the ham chips which are a giant step up from bacon bits.  I used thin slices of prosciutto, baked until leathery, about 10 minutes.  They crisped up a bit more as they cooled.  I coarsely chopped them.

Next, we have horseradish cream.  I went with the crème fraîche option.  The recipe instructs you to beat the crème fraiche with a whisk until it becomes stiff.  Because the crème fraiche has a lot of body to begin with, I was highly skeptical that whisking it would do anything.  In fact, after whisking for a few minutes, it didn’t noticeably thicken.  I kept at it, and, all of a sudden had soft peaks, similar to whipped cream.  Interesting.  To finish it off, horseradish, salt and lemon juice are added for a piquant topping.

I really enjoyed this one.  As I said, I found the “naked” soup boring, but with a dollop of horseradish cream and a sprinkle of ham chips, it is truly wonderful.

To work through the rest of my celery root, I plan to try David Lebovitz’s Céleri Rémoulade recipe and this celery root gratin.  Any other suggestions from fellow celery root fans?

You can find the recipe for the soup on page 106 of David Lebovitz’s My Paris Kitchen.  My friends at Cook the Book Fridays will also have something to say about their own renditions of the soup here.

Lest I forget, the highlight of my week last week wasn’t packing vegetables (though Thursday morning at the farm is typically my favorite part of the week).  The best part was a quick visit from my blogging friend Mary of Lights On Bright No Brakes.  During her 30-hour stop in Boston, we cooked dinner together and spent the good part of a day perusing the galleries at Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts.  We even snuck in coffee and pastries with our old pal Tricia (daughter of Ro from Chez Nana) from French Fridays who was also in town.  Here’s Mary and me in the Takashi Murakami exhibit.  We loved his vibrant colors and sense of fun.